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Minnetonka Shingle Style

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Craftsman Addition & Restoration

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Modern Renovation

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A 16-foot island allows the kitchen to be one-sided yet highly functional for our client, a fabulous cook. French doors to the left provide light, views, and easy access to courtyard dining.

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Lake Superior Retreat

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Park Point Home

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Transformed Traditional

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A spacious kitchen work area is essential to feeding throngs. Strategically placed eating areas—in the adjacent porch, dining room and tucked into the stair—graciously seat all.

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East Harriet Addition

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Historic Georgian

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Rustic Retreat

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Edina Mid-Century

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A shallow exterior bay with deep-set windows creates a light, bright nook that opens onto the porch, allowing le petit déjeuner en plein air.

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The homeowner needed storage space, and a home for his art. We collaborated with the client in designing unobtrusive cabinetry along the wall, which allows art to be layered in front.

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The home was built in the 1940s. Like most homes of that era, rooms were isolated from one another. The homeowners wanted to maintain the original footprint and rough-cut limestone exterior that initially attracted them to the home, while opening it up for modern living. With only one entrance from the main hall, the living room was a dead end. To create a second opening at the rear of the living room that connects to the kitchen, TEA2 moved the central staircase forward several feet.

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Strategically perched above the ravine, the breakfast nook enjoys southern sun and a Lake Superior view.

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Seamless Neighbor

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Italian Villa

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Hilldale Addition

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Calhoun Contemporary

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We designed the dining room around a beloved heirloom cabinet. Graceful stairs enhance the room’s character, as do hand-scraped floors.

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Rustic Retreat

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Highly divided transom windows over more open-paned glass lend character while preserving the view.

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The homeowners’ goal of an evening glow was created with carefully selected woodwork, stone and lighting. The essence is of a handmade boat—reflective of Arts & Crafts style, but filled with light.

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Old row houses are long and dark, all rooms lined up front to back. This open floor plan expands the space; a large skylight over the stair and variety of strategically placed high windows fill it with light.

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The wall material is plywood, routed vertically to look like tongue-and-groove boards. The deeply set, natural wood cabinets create warmth while hiding a television.

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New Tudor

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Edina Arts & Crafts

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Shingle-Style Lake Home, Northern Minnesota

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A sequence of french doors opens to the east, providing ample morning light and a real connection to the landscape; while the house feels traditional, it lets in far more light and views than a traditional design would.

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Rustic Retreat

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Creating detail and character without being slave to an old style can be a challenge. Here, cabinetry and vanities feel historical, yet fresh.

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We used inset tile in the master bath to create a mosaic tile “rug.” Built-in glass cabinets provide airiness and balance to the room.

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The master vanity area is located within the tower. Even here, the outside world takes precedence: The vanity mirror stands away from the window, view unobstructed.

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Equestrian Country House

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Italianate Villa

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Rustic Bunkhouse

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Kenwood Shingle Style Cottage

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Tudor Transformation

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Italianate Villa

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Linden Hills Cottage

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Deephaven Revival

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Transformed Tudor

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Sunny Lake Home

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Contemporary Cape Cod

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Nautical Shingle Style

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A formal entryway was forsaken for a casual, eclectic entry/bead-board mudroom. Guests can head straight to the lake-facing screened porch or turn and step in to the kitchen and great room.

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Modern English Country House

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Kenwood Shingle Style Cottage

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New Tudor

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We use features like this curving dormer to create little “moments” both in the home and on the roofline. Here it allowed us to gracefully “cut the corner” between rooms as well as roof gables.

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Lake Superior Retreat

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Transformed Traditional

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A wine cellar becomes a work of art itself, the wine collection framed in an arched doorway.

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Cozy Lake Cottage

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Italianate Villa

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Shingle Style Lake Home

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Tangletown Addition

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Hometime Autumn Woods

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Shingle Style Lake Home

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Kenwood Shingle Style Cottage

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Linden Hills Cottage

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Deephaven Revival

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Hilldale Addition

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Rustic Bunkhouse

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Cozy Lake Cottage

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Country Club Addition

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Country Club Addition

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Italianate Villa

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Rolling Green Transformation

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Italianate Villa

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Orono Poolhouse

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Gate & Carriage House

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Rolling Green Transformation

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English Country House

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Lake Carlos Boat House

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Wayzata Pool House

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Lake Carlos Gate House

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Superior Carriage House

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Cabin Retreat

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Modern Carriage

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English Country House

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Edina Classical

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The terrace of our dreams: partly covered, with columns framing broad and tall views, to combine the best of indoors and nature—creating a magical place.

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Such a strong indoor-outdoor connection is rare with “historic” homes, but enhances livability and joy, and is well worth achieving.

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Wood columns and flared fieldstone piers create classic yet relaxed architecture, fitting for a casual lake lifestyle. The porch is designed just deep enough to sit in under the rain, but not so deep as to block light from reaching inside the home.

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The property didn’t have a sumptuous view, so we gave it one: an inner courtyard bracketed by home and pergola. Walls of glass make the home feel light and open, but the shape creates an outdoor “room” and sense of protection.

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Bluffside Home

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The rear loggia overlooks a picturesque, Italian garden-inspired landscape. Tall arched openings provide full views into the grand salon. Each traditionally set keystone weighs over a ton.

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New construction, Italianate Villa, Landscape, Edina, Minnesota, TEA 2 Architects

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We designed a long and shallow porch—to provide distinct living areas with up-close, expansive views of the lake.

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Family Heritage Cottage

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